Keynote Conference: “I Could Be Wrong: Reconciling Knowledge and Faith in Democratic Education” by Prof. Jeffrey Ayala Milligan

We are very happy to announce the keynote address of Professor Jeffrey Ayala Milligan (Florida State University, USA) entitled “I Could Be Wrong: Reconciling Knowledge and Faith in Democratic Education” at the 1st UP-IIS International Conference on the role of the State, education, community outreach, responsible media, and religio-cultural dialogues in countering violent extremism. It will be held on September 22, 2018 (Saturday) at the National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (NISMED) of the University of the Philippines Diliman.

Prof. Milligan is the UP-IIS Visiting Professor and Fulbright Specialist from October to December 2018. He will lead the International Book Seminar of his book, Islamic Identity, Postcoloniality, and Educational Policy: Schooling and Ethno-Religious Conflict in the Southern Philippines (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), on September 24, 2018 (Monday).

Abstract:

The place of religion in the education of children in religiously diverse, multicultural societies is complex. For much of history, and much of the world today, the inculcation of mainstream religious beliefs in school is often seen as unproblematic. But it in fact raises profound concerns about the rights of religious minorities and those without religious beliefs to an education free of unwanted religious imposition. Moreover, in many quarters religious truth claims are seen as impediments to the inculcation of scientific habits of thought so central to modern technological societies. Such concerns lead many modern, democratic societies to more or less exclude religious learning from government-sponsored education, but this too raises concerns about the rights of individuals and their families to pass on their religious beliefs and receive a modern education without the undue burden of supporting their children in two separate educational systems. How might we reconcile these tensions in the education of children for modern, democratic citizenship in religiously diverse, multicultural societies?

This presentation will offer for consideration a conceptual framework intended to reconcile these tensions. It will examine the relevance of Cornel West’s (1998) notion of prophetic pragmatism as a candidate for such a framework, paying particular attention to the tensions between pragmatist epistemology and the knowledge claims commonly asserted in Islam before exploring the concept of epistemic humility as an ethic potentially acceptable to religious believers and consistent with pragmatist epistemology. It will conclude with a tentative exploration of the meaning of an ethic of epistemic humility for both religious and secular education.

Keynote Speaker’s profile:

Dr. Jeffrey Ayala Milligan is Director of the Learning Systems Institute and a Professor of philosophy of education and international and comparative education in the department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During his tenure at LSI he has been involved in the implementation of international educational development projects in Southeast Asia and Africa. His research explores the challenges posed by religious tensions in the educational systems of multicultural, religiously diverse communities in the United States and Southeast Asia. He is the author of two books – Islamic Identity, Postcoloniality and Educational Policy: Schooling and Ethno-Religious Conflict in the Southern Philippines (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005) and Teaching at the Crossroads of Faith and School: The Teacher as Prophetic Pragmatist (Lanham: University Press of America, 2002). He is the co-editor of Citizenship, Identity and Education in Muslim Communities: Essays on Attachment and Obligation (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), and author of more than thirty refereed articles in Philosophy of Education, Comparative Education Review, Journal of Thought, Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, Asia-Pacific Education Review, Educational Policy, and other academic journals. He has been the recipient of two Fulbright Senior Fellowships (Philippines, 1999 and Malaysia, 2006) and a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Dr. Milligan is a fellow and past Executive Director of the Philosophy of Education Society and a member of the International Network of Philosophers of Education and the Comparative and International Education Society.

Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Milligan, J. A., Stanfill, E., Widyanto, A., & Zhang, H. (2011). Philosophers Without Borders? Toward a Comparative Philosophy of Education. Educational Studies, 47, 50-70.

Milligan, J. A. (2010). The Prophet and the Engineer Meet Under the Mango Tree: Leadership, Education and Conflict in the Southern Philippines. Educational Policy, 24(1), 28-51.

Milligan, J. A., & Zhang, H. (2010). Self-Enlightenment in the Context of Radical Social Change: A Neo-Confucian Critique of John Dewey’s Conception of Intelligence. Journal of Thought, 45(1-2), 29-41. Retrieved from http://www.journalofthought.com/index.php?page=currentIssue&year=2010&volume=45&issue=12

Milligan, J. A. (2009). Prophetic Pragmatism? Post-Conflict Educational Development in Aceh and Mindanao. Diaspora, Indigenous and Minority Education: An International Journal, 3(4), 245-259.

Merry, M., & Milligan, J. A. (2009). Complexities of Belonging in Democratic/Democratizing Societies: Islamic Identity, Ethnicity and Citizenship in the Netherlands and Aceh. Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, 29(3), 311-323.

Milligan, J. A. (2008). Islam and Educational Policy Reform in the Southern Philippines. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 28(4), 369-381.

Milligan, J. A. (2007). Pedagogical Fundamentalisms: Religion, Markets and the Discourse of Accountability in U.S. Educational Reform. Educational Awakenings, 4(1), 1-25.

Milligan, J. A. (2006). Gender and the Limits of Inclusion: Should Multiculturalism ‘Include’ Fundamentalisms? Manifest, 1(2), 89-96.

Milligan, J. A. (2006). Reclaiming an Ideal: The Islamization of Education in the Southern Philippines. Comparative Education Review, 50(3), 410-430.

Milligan, J. A. (2005). Faith in School: Educational Policy Responses to Ethno-Religious Conflict in the Southern Philippines, 1935-1985. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, 36(1), 67-86.

Milligan, J. A. (2005). Postcolonial Pragmatism? Ethno-Religious Conflict and Education in Postcolonial Spaces. Philosophy of Education, 287-295.

Milligan, J. A. (2005). Teaching in Moloch: Toward a Prophetic Pragmatic Critique of Pedagogical Fundamentalism. Journal of Thought, 42(2), 97-111.

Milligan, J. A. (2004). Islamization or Secularization? Educational Reform and the Search for Peace in the Southern Philippines. Current Issues in Comparative Education, 7(1), 1-8. Retrieved from http://www.tc.columbia.edu/cice/articles/jm171.htm:1-8.

Milligan, J. A. (2004). Democratization or Neocolonialism? The Education of Muslims Under U.S. Military Occupation, 1903-1920. History of Education, 33(4), 451-467.

Milligan, J. A. (2003). Teaching Between the Cross and the Crescent Moon: Islamic Identity, Postcoloniality and Public Education in the Southern Philippines. Comparative Education Review, 47(4), 468-492.

Milligan, J. A. (2003). Teaching in the Presence of Burning Children: Attending to Tragedy and Faith in Philosophy And/Of Education. Educational Foundations, 17(1), 1-18.

Milligan, J. A. (2003). Religious Diversity and the Concept of Separation: Do Good Fences Make Good Neighbors? Philosophy of Education 2003, 411-419.

Milligan, J. A. (2002). Religion, Diversity and Public Education: Challenges for Teacher Education in the U.S. and Philippines. Silliman Journal, 42(2), 12-37.

Milligan, J. A. (2002). Religion, Diversity and Public Education: Challenges for Teacher Education in the U.S. and the Philippines. Silliman Journal, 42(2), 12-37.

Milligan, J. A. (2001). Religious Identity, Autonomy, and National Integrity: Implications for Educational Policy from Muslim-Christian Conflict in the Philippines. Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, 12(4), 435-448.

Milligan, J. A. (2000). Mapping the Road Toward Bethlehem: Parameters for Discourse on the Relationship between Religion and Public Education. Educational Policy, 14(5), 685-702.

Milligan, J. A. (2000). Rethinking the Ideal of the Educated Person: An Alternative from the Maranao-Filipino Oral Epic “Darangen”. Journal of Thought, 35(3), 67-79.

Milligan, J. A. (2000). Neocolonialism and Peace Corps Teaching in the Philippines. Philippine Studies, 18, 109-120.

Milligan, J. A. (1999). Gender and the Limits of Inclusion: Should Multiculturalism Include Fundamentalism? Religious Education, 94(1), 75-83.

Milligan, J. A. (1999). Multiculturalism or ‘Second-Persons?’ An Alternative Approach to Teaching. Encounter: Education for Meaning and Social Justice, 12(3), 23-32.

Milligan, J. A. (1999). The Idolatry of Multicultural Education: A Prophetic Pragmatic Alternative? Multicultural Education, 6(3), 2-5.

Milligan, J. A. (1999). Love, Jazz and a Sense of the Holy: Conceptualizing the Teacher in Toni Morrison’s “Beloved”. Philosophy of Education, 368-376.

Milligan, J. A. (1998). Critical Pedagogy: Responsible Teaching for the Rural Community College. Removing Vestiges: Research Based Strategies to Promote Inclusion, 1(1), 21-26.

Milligan, J. A. (1997). Multiculturalism and Christian Fundamentalism: Strange Postmodern Bedfellows? Religion and Education, 24(2), 28-34.

Milligan, J. A. (1997). Teaching at the Crossroads of Faith and School: The Teacher as Prophetic Pragmatist. Philosophy of Education, 47-56.

Milligan, J. A. (1996). Religion, Public Education and Dewey’s Call for an ‘Intelligent’ Theory of Education. Educational Foundations, 10(3), 69-83.

Milligan, J. A. (1996). Multiculturalism and the Religious Right: Is Dialogue Possible? Journal of Thought, 31(1), 45-54.

Refereed Books

Milligan, J. A. (2005). Islamic Identity, Postcoloniality and Educational Policy: Schooling and Ethno-Religious Conflict in the Southern Philippines. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Milligan, J. A. (2002). Teaching at the Crossroads of Faith and School: The Teacher as Prophetic Pragmatist. Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

Edited Books

Merry, M. S., & Milligan, J. A. (Eds.). (2010). Citizenship, Identity and Education in Muslim Communities: Essays on Attachment and Obligation. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Invited Book Chapters

Milligan, J. A. (in press). Preserving the Faith: Muslim Education in the Philippines. In H. Daun, & R. Arjmand (Eds.), Handbook of Islamic Education (25 pages). Springer.

Merry, M. S., & Milligan, J. A. (2010). Citizenship, Identity and Education in Muslim Communities. In M. S. Merry, & J. A. Milligan (Eds.), Citizenship, Identity and Education in Muslim Communities: Essays on Attachment and Obligation (pp. 20). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Milligan, J. A. (2006). Between the Cross and the Crescent Moon: The Education of Muslim Filipinos. In R. Griffin (Ed.), Education in the Muslim World (pp. 271-288). Oxford, UK: Symposium Books.

Milligan, J. A. (2000). The Idolatry of Multicultural Education: A Prophetic Pragmatic Alternative? In F. Schultz (Ed.), Annual Editions: Multicultural Education (pp. 57-60). Guilford, CT: Dushkin/McGraw-Hill.

Refereed Book Chapters

Milligan, J. A. (2007). Reclaiming an Ideal: The Islamization of Education in the Southern Philippines. In K. Wadad, & V. Billeh (Eds.), Islam and Education: Myths and Truths (pp. 104-124). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Milligan, J. A. (2001). Multiculturalism and the Idolatry of Inclusion. In S. R. Steinberg (Ed.), Multi/Intercultural Conversations: A Reader (pp. 31-47). New York: Peter Lang.

Invited Encyclopedia Entries

Milligan, J. A. (2012). Philippines, Islamic education in the. In J.L. Esposito (Ed.), Oxford Islamic Studies Online. Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/article/opr/t343/e0012

Nonrefereed Journal Articles

Milligan, J. A., Fontaine, H., & Dwyer, M. (2009). The Future of the Profession: The Development of Graduate Students as Teachers in American Universities. Interim Report, Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 36-42.

Milligan, J. A. (2005). Americans in the Philippines: Here We Go Again? Lincoln Journal Star, 5.

Milligan, J. A. (2005). Truth, Faith and Tolerance. Philosophy of Education 2004, 242-244.

Milligan, J. A. (1999). The Idolatry of Multicultural Education: A Prophetic Pragmatic Alternative? Interdisciplinary Studies/Society of Educators and Scholars: Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference, 97-103.

Milligan, J. A., Gaddy, B. B., Hall W. T., & Marzano R. J. (1997). Review of School Wars: Resolving Our Conflicts Over Religion and Values. Educational Studies, 28(1), 24-28.

Milligan, J. A. (1996). Teaching Second-Sight: Crossing the Color-Line in Freshman Composition? Multicultural Education, 48-50.

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